Recent Paintings and Drawings from Tuscany

As our move to Florence is getting closer, a visit to Tuscany was due in order to do some house hunting. We were very lucky to have found ourselves a beautiful new home, as well as profit from the beauty of the Tuscan summer. There was not a lot of time to paint, but I tried to get the most out of this visit to the Chianti region, as I find the colours and light to be just right this time of the year.

On this trip, in addition painting with watercolors and doing one drawing in graphite pencil, I decided to experiment a bit with pastels – a medium I like quite a bit, but have used only a couple of times before. I thought this would be a good occasion to do some more work with pastels, since we were travelling by car and I had no weight limitations.

Also, knowing that as of this October I will be working only in charcoal and pencil at the Florence Academy of Art, I feel the need to explore different media at this stage and see what they have to offer.

Overall, drawing with pastels was a lot of fun. It’s a rather straightforward material to work with, it’s not too messy and things tend to move at quite a fast pace when using it. Even more so if one does not sharpen their pastels, which I decided not to as I was more interested in the light and color effects then the precision in my drawing.

What I enjoyed the most when working with pastels is that you can apply them in layers and change things as you go. So, compared to watercolors, they are much easier to handle, in my opinion.

What I didn’t enjoy as much about pastels is that the end result seems to be quite fragile. Because of their chalky nature, one needs to use a fixative on top of a finished drawing. Asides from the fact that it smells like cancer in a bottle, fixative seems to darken a tiny bit the overall colors and never really seems to ‘fix’ a drawing completely – at least not the one I was using. Namely, even after applying it in several goes vertically and horizontally, I would still get some residue of pastels on my finger when I tapped it lightly on the drawing.

I am also not sure if I would recommend pastels for painting outdoors – one of my drawings got pretty damaged by just a few drops of rain and another when the paper on which it was drawn got bended by the wind. So, I repeat – pretty fragile stuff. Other than that, a lot of fun to work with.

To cut the long story short, here are the results of the past weeks’ efforts – starting with the watercolors, followed by a graphite pencil drawing and concluding with a small series of pastel drawings.

Damigiane. 25 x 28 cm, Watercolor and Gouache.

Damigiane. 25 x 28 cm, Watercolor and Gouache.

 

Wild flowers. 9 x 12 in, Watercolor.

Wild Flowers. 9 x 12 in, Watercolor.

 

Noce from la Torricella. 20 x 27 cm, Watercolor.

Noce from la Torricella. 20 x 27 cm, Watercolor.

 

Pomegranate flower. 7 x 10 in, Watercolor.

Study of a Pomegranate Flower. 7 x 10 in, Watercolor.

 

Sunflower. 25 x 28 cm, Watercolor.

Sunflower. 25 x 28 cm, Watercolor.

 

Peaches. 10 x 14 in, Watercolor.

Peaches. 10 x 14 in, Watercolor.

 

Portrait of Marc. 9 x 12 in, Graphite on Paper.

Portrait of Marc. 9 x 12 in, Graphite on Paper.

 

Tuscan garden. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

Tuscan Garden. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

 

Wild flowers. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

Wild Flowers. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

 

Bistecca Fiorentina. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

Bistecca Fiorentina. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

 

Cipolle. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.

Cipolle. 21 x 30 cm, Pastels.